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Dynamics of Domestic Violence PGCert / PGDip / MA

These courses are offered by the National Centre for the Study and Prevention of Violence and Abuse (NCSPVA) at the University of Worcester.

The Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters degree are designed to situate domestic violence historically, and critically explore this complex issue by looking at theoretical perspectives of causation, examining the impact of it and analysing interventions and good practice professional responses.

The ultimate aim of the courses is to support you to establish a firm knowledge and evidence base for practice which is rooted in theory, legislation policy and standards. The courses offer the opportunity for in-depth and critical study. They allow you to follow your personal and professional interests through independent study and teach transferable skills including, but not limited to: critical thinking, presentation skills, academic writing, professional report writing, group work and research skills.

The course is delivered by an award-winning team of specialists in the field with a wealth of academic and practice experience. In 2010 the course was reviewed by an independent panel which highlighted the course leader's inspirational leadership and expressed appreciation of the course's transformational nature, which facilitated personal and professional development.

"An innovative, market leading, flagship programme which integrated service users, providers and practitioners in its delivery." (ASME Report, 2010)

Please note this Masters Programme is subject to revalidation to be offered as an MA in Domestic Violence and Sexual Violence and will be offered on a Full Time and Part Time basis.

For further information please see our Masters' FAQs and/or contact the Course Leader, Claire Richards, via c.richards@worc.ac.uk.

Postgraduate Loans

Postgraduate Loans of up to £10,000 are now available for UK students. For more information visit our postgraduate loans page

Factfile

How to Apply

Apply for September 2017 enrolment

Apply for this course - part time

Please make your application via our online application form. If you have any questions, please contact the Admissions office on 01905 855111 or pg-admissions@worc.ac.uk


Entry requirements

To gain entry to the course, you will normally be required to have either: 
A good first degree
or 
Professional qualifications in an appropriate area
or
Relevant practical experience

As the content of the course involves a mixture of practical and academic elements, each application will be considered on its own merits. You may be invited for interview and may be required to submit a written piece of work on the reasons for wanting to study for this qualification.

In many cases it is possible to gain credit for previous study or experience. Previous study at the same level in other institutions is recognised as transferred academic credit, and professional learning can be analysed through the completion of an Independent Study.  Up to 50% of taught elements of the award for which you are registered may be achieved through Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) or Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).


Who should apply?

Though this is a Postgraduate course, those wishing to apply do not have to have achieved education at degree level. The courses are open to:

  • Anyone with a general interest in domestic violence
  • Those currently in practice in the field of domestic violence who would like to gain a specialist qualification
  • Those with an interest in becoming a domestic violence professional who would like to gain a specialist qualification
  • Multi-agency professionals
  • Mangers and policy makers

You may be asked for interview and may be asked to demonstrate an ability to study at postgraduate level by submitting some written work prior to admission


Study options

From its inception, this course has met with a high level of demand for places from outside the geographical area of the West Midlands. The University of Worcester has responded to that demand by expanding the structure of the course to allow for greater accessibility.

The course is modular in structure, with the full MA consisting of nine modules in total. Mandatory and Optional modules are taught in blocks (two three-day blocks per semester).

You will also be expected (with tutor support) to participate in web based discussion groups and undertake additional reading and research throughout the year.

Get in touch

Claire Richards
Course Leader
01905 542487
c.richards@worc.ac.uk

Admissions Office
01905 855111
admissions@worc.ac.uk

Employability

Employability

This course is aimed at professionals such as Social Workers, Police Officers, Court Welfare Officers, Magistrates, Probation Officers, Health Professionals, Housing Officers and those working in the voluntary sector, as well as university graduates seeking to embark on such professions.

Recent graduates from the course have used the qualification to:

 • Secure promotions & pay increases
 • Become key domestic violence workers for their organisation/agency
 • Gain new jobs
 • Implement new domestic violence services in the local community
 • Become the first male victim worker in the local geographical area
 • Provide expert witness testimony in court
 • Won awards for services to domestic abuse

Course content

Course pathways

Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence

This is a 1 year course consisting of 3 modules. Each module is taught over 2 X 3 day blocks. You must attend both blocks (total of 6 days) and with tutor support, will be required to do set and independent reading, and work towards assignments outside of taught days.

Upon successful completion of the 3 modules (attendance and assessment), you will gain the Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence and 60 credits that can be banked towards future Postgraduate Level study.

Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence

When you successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence can apply to continue onto the Postgraduate Diploma by studying for one more year.

The second year will consist of a further 3 modules. Each module is taught over 2 X 3 day blocks. You must attend both blocks (total of 6 days) and with tutor support, will be required to do set and independent reading and work towards assignments outside of taught days.

Upon successful completion of the modules (attendance and assessment), students will gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence and a further 60 credits that can be banked towards any future Postgraduate Level study.

Masters Degree in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence

When you successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence can apply to continue onto the final year of study to gain a Masters Degree.

The final year requires you to complete a one year Dissertation (equivalent of 3 modules). The dissertation (MDVM4006) provides the opportunity for you to explore in a systematic and in-depth manner a topic of their choice but related to domestic violence.

There are no taught sessions in this final year. The Dissertation is independent research but you will be supervised and supported by tutors throughout and there will be regular workshops.

Upon successful completion of the Dissertation you will gain a Masters Degree in Professional Development: The Dynamics of Domestic Violence.

For further information please see our Masters' FAQs.

Short Courses for Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Many of the modules taught as part of our courses can be studied as stand-alone short courses that you can take as part of your Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Each short course (module) is taught over 2 X 3 day blocks. You must attend both blocks (total of 6 days) and with tutor support, will be required to do set and independent reading and work towards assignments outside of taught days.

Upon successful completion of any short course (module) (attendance and assessment), you will gain a University Level 7 certificate and 20 credits that they can bank towards future Postgraduate Level study.

When you complete any short course (module) for CPD can count the credits gained towards the Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma/Masters Degree should they wish to continue with their studies.


Assessment

Assessment across the modules may include:

  • Essays
  • Reports
  • Case Studies
  • Presentations
  • Professional reflection
  • Group work
Student views

Student views

The NCSPVA delivers the Post Graduate Certificate to Social Workers in Essex, here are some of their thoughts about the course and its modules.

“I think the course has raised a number of challenging dynamics of DV which has helped challenge my own practice.” 

“Powerful, thought-provoking course which will be invaluable for professional practice.”

“I am confident the DV training will give me a broader understanding of the reason behind, impact on and possible ideas to ‘break the chain’. I can then share the knowledge with my team and use the knowledge to inform assessments.”

“I really enjoyed the first teaching block – both tutors are excellent and easy to listen to... [I] learned a lot and was able to reflect. Great food for thought”.

“This module highly links in with my role. The majority of my cases involve DV and this module is allowing reflection and thinking specifically around the links between DV, mental health and substance misuse.”


Academic department

Institute of Health & Society  

“The University is a leading innovator in the fields of health and social care. Unique appointments such as the UK’s first professors of perinatal education and tissue viability demonstrate our commitment to research excellence.”
Louise Jones, Head of Institute


Course Objectives

Course objectives

1. Provide a stimulating environment in which you can engage in collective exploration of the nature and dynamics of domestic violence, including reasons why those experiencing it may stay in or return to abusive relationships.

2. Provide an opportunity for students from diverse backgrounds to succeed in achieving postgraduate qualifications through the development of advanced subject specific and transferable knowledge and skill.

3. Support you in the development of oral and written analytical skills to enable them to critically evaluate definitions and key theoretical perspectives of domestic violence, historical and/or contemporary policy discourses; research and all other data relating to it.

4. Help you to conceptualise the historical, social, and political forces that have resulted in changing perceptions of domestic violence and relate this to contemporary notions of domestic violence.

5. Advance your critical understanding of the multiple ‘costs’ of domestic violence to ‘victims’, those close to them, and to society from a cross cultural perspective.

6. Encourage you to examine and develop a critical understanding of good practice frameworks, your roles, responsibilities and approaches in engaging with and supporting individuals who have experienced or who are experiencing domestic violence.

7. Enable you to develop a strong sense of professional identity through reflective practice.

8. Provide the opportunity to design and conduct a substantive study utilising an appropriate research methodology and associated research methods within ethical practice as dictated by the University of Worcester ethics framework and that of external frameworks where applicable.